Prioritizing What’s Important

Prioritizing What’s Important

A few months ago, my email app on my phone was glitching. I could not get the notifications to disappear.

I tried everything. Looking for threads where an unread message might be lurking, clearing out my messages through a separate email service, but try as I might, that notification remained.

Notifications pester me into action.

In those tiny red numbers, I see opportunity. An email response I was waiting for, a chance to multitask, an opportunity to connect with a friend. My heart almost skips a beat when those numbers appear, and in those milliseconds of anticipation, I think:

Maybe something has happened. Something wonderful. Something tragic. Some adventure or reward or warning. Something.

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Talking To Children About Tragedies

Talking To Children About Tragedies

Today is September 11, and many of our minds are circling back to stories of tragedy, loss, and grief. My heart feels heavy, and it isn’t just this singular event, or the wars that have followed, but devastation around the world: the haunting picture of the two-year-old boy who drowned while trying to flee Syria with his family, stories marking the ten-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Facebook posts from friends doing relief work in Nepal following the earthquake.

This morning, I read an article in Brain, Child magazine about what it was like to be a mother in New York on the morning of 9/11, and I once again feel overwhelmed by the staggering hurt and pain that exists in the world. Reconciling the gap between my life and the lives in the stories I have recently encountered is impossible.

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Staying Present With Our Children

Staying Present With Our Children

If you’re a parent, you’ve probably heard, “Enjoy them when they’re young! They grow up so fast!” But what if we stopped trying to “enjoy” our children, and practiced staying present with our children?

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Helping Children Say Goodbye Without Distracting

Helping Children Say Goodbye Without Distracting

Toys serve as emotional distractions, and if children don’t learn to manage strong emotional feelings when they are young in healthy ways, what things will substitute for toys as children grow up? Kelly Matthews shares her insights.

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